Select an area from the list below to view Project Plan details including historical views, current state,
and the vision for the future.


Shawsheen Village

“Good Bones”. That is Shawsheen Village today.

Built between 1919 and 1924 by William Madison Wood, the early 20th century textile industrialist. At one time Wood was the wealthiest man in the United States. He sent his artisans to Europe instructing them to stay there until they had everything needed for excellence in the realization of his vision.

Because Wood built the Shawsheen Village to the highest standards it is easy to return it to its former glory today.

Click to enlarge images.
"Brick" Shawsheen
The homes in this area are listed in the National Historic Register of Historic Places as part of William Madison Wood's vision for Shawsheen Village.
The Shawsheen River
The Shawsheen River runs through the heart of the village. The existing stone bridges and fencing along the river help define the character of this area. The river currently lacks access and pedestrian walkways.
"White Shawsheen"
The homes in this area are listed in the National Historic Register of Historic Places as part of William Madison Wood's vision for Shawsheen Village.
Shawsheen River
"Best Kept Secret" to be opened up for more public amenity
An aerial view of Shawsheen Village.

The Shawsheen River
Or "Great Spring" is a well preserved, natural resource for local residents

Street Furniture
Amenity that will be used more in the future
Good Bones
Original features need only a little attention to realize much public value
Poor Drainage
Kills plants in winter
Feaster Five
Starts right here in Shawsheen Village
Peaceful Streetscape on Balmoral Street Bowling Green Fence
Small items can make big visual improvements
Public Seating Original Stonework
Reflects a rich history throughout the Village
The Bowling Green
Preserved by Rotary
Bridge on Balmoral Street with "The Balmoral"
One of the best built bridges in Massachusetts
Cracked Pavements
An opportunity
Poor Drainage
Pedestrians and the environment (salt) would both benefit
©2007 Shawsheen Renaissance Project